Switch to full style
Discuss MLB and everything baseball that's not Mets baseball.
Post a reply

Baseball Gets Real - Not Mets related, but bear with me

Thu Jun 19, 2014 11:14 pm

I'm currently vacationing in Panama (amazing country, highly recommended). I'm on the tail end of my trip, in Panama City prior to departure. Staying at a high-end hotel, I went down to the bar for a few drinks this evening. The bartender was quite tall, probably 6 foot 4 with gigantic hands. What does and NYFSer think? Pitcher? I start talking to the guy, and it turns out he's from the Dominican. I talk to him a bit more, and it turns out he was actually a pitcher, who was signed ("My son is in Washington Heights, he don't like to speak Spanish."). "My shoulder got hurt, I tore it, and they told me I was going home to get better, but I knew, it wasn't to get better."

I'm posting this because I found it interesting that there are so many prospects we don't even consider prospects, but I think it's important that we remember they're real people. This guy told me that when he was 20 in the States pitching, he couldn't drink so he would observe the bartenders and ask them questions, thus how he learned his trade.

Who was his favorite player? A certain Mr. Reyes. But he doesn't watch baseball anymore.

Anyway mods, feel free to move this, but I thought it would be good for the community to see, even if it isn't directly Mets-related.

Re: Baseball Gets Real - Not Mets related, but bear with me

Fri Jun 20, 2014 1:07 am

I'm pretty good in the cages.

Re: Baseball Gets Real - Not Mets related, but bear with me

Fri Jun 20, 2014 1:38 pm

northway wrote:I'm currently vacationing in Panama (amazing country, highly recommended). I'm on the tail end of my trip, in Panama City prior to departure. Staying at a high-end hotel, I went down to the bar for a few drinks this evening. The bartender was quite tall, probably 6 foot 4 with gigantic hands. What does and NYFSer think? Pitcher? I start talking to the guy, and it turns out he's from the Dominican. I talk to him a bit more, and it turns out he was actually a pitcher, who was signed ("My son is in Washington Heights, he don't like to speak Spanish."). "My shoulder got hurt, I tore it, and they told me I was going home to get better, but I knew, it wasn't to get better."

I'm posting this because I found it interesting that there are so many prospects we don't even consider prospects, but I think it's important that we remember they're real people. This guy told me that when he was 20 in the States pitching, he couldn't drink so he would observe the bartenders and ask them questions, thus how he learned his trade.

Who was his favorite player? A certain Mr. Reyes. But he doesn't watch baseball anymore.

Anyway mods, feel free to move this, but I thought it would be good for the community to see, even if it isn't directly Mets-related.


The was a story a few years back, in the Times, I think, that was about a large group of ex-minor leaguers, mostly Dominican, who get together and play baseball in one of the city parks.

It's a side we don't see often (unless we're getting a drink in Panama :wink: ) but these guys lead a pretty tenuous existence.

Most of them grow up in abject poverty and they chase a dream. Even with the larger international bonuses, many sign for a small amount of money compared to draftees. That makes them more disposable since there isn't as much money invested in most of them.

Then, for whatever reason, they don't make it and they're left to their own devices. A lot of the guys in the Times piece were working in restaurant kitchens.

Everyone knows the deal going in, but it's still a pretty rough way to go.

You can also look at ballplayers from any background. Imagine what it's like to have a dream from the time you're a young kid. You're pretty good--best in the town, best in the area, even all-state. Then you get to the pros and it all ends, sometimes suddenly, when you're barely into your 20s.

Re: Baseball Gets Real - Not Mets related, but bear with me

Fri Jun 20, 2014 7:30 pm

Chico wrote:
northway wrote:I'm currently vacationing in Panama (amazing country, highly recommended). I'm on the tail end of my trip, in Panama City prior to departure. Staying at a high-end hotel, I went down to the bar for a few drinks this evening. The bartender was quite tall, probably 6 foot 4 with gigantic hands. What does and NYFSer think? Pitcher? I start talking to the guy, and it turns out he's from the Dominican. I talk to him a bit more, and it turns out he was actually a pitcher, who was signed ("My son is in Washington Heights, he don't like to speak Spanish."). "My shoulder got hurt, I tore it, and they told me I was going home to get better, but I knew, it wasn't to get better."

I'm posting this because I found it interesting that there are so many prospects we don't even consider prospects, but I think it's important that we remember they're real people. This guy told me that when he was 20 in the States pitching, he couldn't drink so he would observe the bartenders and ask them questions, thus how he learned his trade.

Who was his favorite player? A certain Mr. Reyes. But he doesn't watch baseball anymore.

Anyway mods, feel free to move this, but I thought it would be good for the community to see, even if it isn't directly Mets-related.


The was a story a few years back, in the Times, I think, that was about a large group of ex-minor leaguers, mostly Dominican, who get together and play baseball in one of the city parks.

It's a side we don't see often (unless we're getting a drink in Panama :wink: ) but these guys lead a pretty tenuous existence.

Most of them grow up in abject poverty and they chase a dream. Even with the larger international bonuses, many sign for a small amount of money compared to draftees. That makes them more disposable since there isn't as much money invested in most of them.

Then, for whatever reason, they don't make it and they're left to their own devices. A lot of the guys in the Times piece were working in restaurant kitchens.

Everyone knows the deal going in, but it's still a pretty rough way to go.

You can also look at ballplayers from any background. Imagine what it's like to have a dream from the time you're a young kid. You're pretty good--best in the town, best in the area, even all-state. Then you get to the pros and it all ends, sometimes suddenly, when you're barely into your 20s.


***Spoiler Alert***
At the end of Sugar, the main character ends up playing in a league right by Yankee Stadium that is filled with ex-minor leaguers from Latin America.

Re: Baseball Gets Real - Not Mets related, but bear with me

Fri Jun 20, 2014 11:08 pm

HCC wrote:
Chico wrote:
northway wrote:I'm currently vacationing in Panama (amazing country, highly recommended). I'm on the tail end of my trip, in Panama City prior to departure. Staying at a high-end hotel, I went down to the bar for a few drinks this evening. The bartender was quite tall, probably 6 foot 4 with gigantic hands. What does and NYFSer think? Pitcher? I start talking to the guy, and it turns out he's from the Dominican. I talk to him a bit more, and it turns out he was actually a pitcher, who was signed ("My son is in Washington Heights, he don't like to speak Spanish."). "My shoulder got hurt, I tore it, and they told me I was going home to get better, but I knew, it wasn't to get better."

I'm posting this because I found it interesting that there are so many prospects we don't even consider prospects, but I think it's important that we remember they're real people. This guy told me that when he was 20 in the States pitching, he couldn't drink so he would observe the bartenders and ask them questions, thus how he learned his trade.

Who was his favorite player? A certain Mr. Reyes. But he doesn't watch baseball anymore.

Anyway mods, feel free to move this, but I thought it would be good for the community to see, even if it isn't directly Mets-related.


The was a story a few years back, in the Times, I think, that was about a large group of ex-minor leaguers, mostly Dominican, who get together and play baseball in one of the city parks.

It's a side we don't see often (unless we're getting a drink in Panama :wink: ) but these guys lead a pretty tenuous existence.

Most of them grow up in abject poverty and they chase a dream. Even with the larger international bonuses, many sign for a small amount of money compared to draftees. That makes them more disposable since there isn't as much money invested in most of them.

Then, for whatever reason, they don't make it and they're left to their own devices. A lot of the guys in the Times piece were working in restaurant kitchens.

Everyone knows the deal going in, but it's still a pretty rough way to go.

You can also look at ballplayers from any background. Imagine what it's like to have a dream from the time you're a young kid. You're pretty good--best in the town, best in the area, even all-state. Then you get to the pros and it all ends, sometimes suddenly, when you're barely into your 20s.


***Spoiler Alert***
At the end of Sugar, the main character ends up playing in a league right by Yankee Stadium that is filled with ex-minor leaguers from Latin America.


I really wanted to ask him if he'd seen Sugar...

Another interesting thing he said was that he didn't even like playing baseball that much, and that he never liked pitching, but he did it to make money for his family and pitched because his uncle made him as it was his best chance of getting off the island.

Re: Baseball Gets Real - Not Mets related, but bear with me

Sat Jun 21, 2014 2:37 am

Never saw the movie. I wonder if the creator of the movie read the same news strory I did.

Re: Baseball Gets Real - Not Mets related, but bear with me

Wed Jun 25, 2014 3:23 pm

I appreciated the post. Thanks.

Re: Baseball Gets Real - Not Mets related, but bear with me

Mon Jun 30, 2014 6:17 am

HCC wrote:
***Spoiler Alert***
At the end of Sugar, the main character ends up playing in a league right by Yankee Stadium that is filled with ex-minor leaguers from Latin America.

Superb baseball movie, maybe my favorite. Highly underrated.
Post a reply